WILLIAM ALFRED C. WARNER

An Ipswich man not remembered on Christchurch Park memorial. 

Born: 3rd September 1893, Ipswich.

Died: 22nd October 1916; age: 23; Died of Wounds – after being shot by a sniper whilst up a telephone pole in France.

Occupation: Steward on Cunard ships

Enlistment Location: Stratford, Essex.

Trained at Colchester Barracks, Butt Road.

Date of Entry Therein: 26th July 1915 – France.

 

Rank: Gunner; Service Number: 38774.

Regiment: Royal Field Artillery, 84th Brigade.

 

Medals Awarded: Victory, British War & 1915 Star.

 

Grave Reference:

V.D.41.

Puchevillers British Cemetery,

Somme,

France.

 

Relatives Notified & Address: Son of Arthur & Amelia, of 58, West Stockwell Street, Colchester, Essex.

 

CENSUS

 

1901   36, Thorpe Road, Cann Hall, Essex.

 

William was 7 years old and living with his parents & siblings.

Arthur Warner, 38, a Railway Guard, born West Bergholt, Essex.

Amelia Warner (nee Harman), 35, born Dover, Kent.

Florence Blanch Warner, 13, born Witham, Essex.

Frederick Arthur Warner, 11, born Witham.

Eva Clara Warner, 9, born Ipswich.

Oliver Edward Warner, 5, born Ipswich.

 

1911   134, Field Road, Forest Gate, Essex.

 

William was 17 years old, an Invoice Clerk – Fancy Drapery. He was living with his parents & siblings.

Arthur, 48, a Railway Guard – Great Eastern Railway.

Amelia, 45.

Florence, 23, a Juvenile Milliner.

Eva, 19, a Ladies Milliner.

Oliver, 15, a Junior Clerk – Railway & Shipping Agency.

Amelia Emma Olive Warner, 5, born Forest Gate, Essex.

Soldiers’ Effects to Amelia Warner – mother.

 

Photographs and family note courtesy of Anne:

 William’s youngest sister, Amelia remembers watching William on parade at Colchester Barracks, Butt Road. The story about his death as far as we know was being shot by a sniper whilst up a telephone pole in France. We can only assume he was connecting communications. William’s brothers survived the war. Oliver was in the Royal Army Medical Corps and Fred was in the Royal Navy. The reason for them moving about was their father’s job – railway guard.

 

Posted in First World War

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