SYDNEY GARNER BENNETT

Image courtesy of Downing College, Cambridge.

Downing College Association Football 1907-8 © Messrs Stearn/Lafayette Photography Ltd

Sydney is remembered on the war memorial at Springfield School, Ipswich – where he was a School Master.

 

Born: 1888, Kirkley, Suffolk.

Died: 20th July 1916; age: 28; KiA instantaneously by a shell

Occupation: School Master in Egypt.

Sydney gained his commission in 1915.

Date of Entry Therein: 10th February 1916 – France.

 

Rank: Second Lieutenant.

Regiment: Suffolk Regiment, 3rd Battalion. Attached to 2nd Battalion.

Formerly Private, 3710, of the Royal Fusiliers.

 

Medals Awarded: Victory & British War.

 

Memorial Reference:

Pier & Face 1C & 2A.

Thiepval Memorial,

Somme,

France.

 

Relatives Notified & Address: Son of Henry & Mary Bennett, of Springfield Villas, Station Road, North Walsham, Norfolk.

 

CENSUS

 

1891   Freeman Street, Wells-Next-the-Sea, Norfolk.

 

Sydney was 2 years old and living with his parents & sisters.

Henry Garner Bennett, 33, a Primitive Methodist Minister, born Milford, Derbyshire.

Mary Bennett (nee Spooner), 33, born Lyng, Norfolk.

Lilian Mary Bennett, 5, born East Harling, Norfolk.

Constance Daisy Bennett, 1, born Wells-Next-the-Sea.

 

1901   24, Garland Street, Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk.

Sydney was 12 years old and living with his father & sisters.

 

Henry, 44, a Primitive Methodist Minister.

Lilian, 15, an Infant Teacher – School.

Constance, 11.

In 1901, Sydney’s mother, 41 year old, Mary was a visitor to 30 year old, Frederick Charles & 27 year old, Emma Henrietta Hayden, at their home – 126, Gwydir Street, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire.

 

Sydney was first educated at the East Anglian School, Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk, before moving on to the Higher Grade School, Cambridge. In 1907, whilst a School Master, at Springfield School, Ipswich, Sydney gained a scholarship, and passed on to Downing College, Cambridge.

He was good at cricket, and often played for Suffolk, as well as for his college.

 

 

Soldiers’ Effects to Rev. Henry Bennett – father.

 

Sydney’s parents were both devoted and faithful members of the Primitive Methodist Church. His father, the Rev. Henry Bennett, a preacher, minister and administrator, and his mother, Mary (who was from a true, old Primitive Methodist family), served with love and ministry the Circuit of East Anglia. In 1905, Rev. Henry and his family moved to Ipswich, which had two established Primitive Methodist Chapel’s – at Rope Walk and Clarkson Street. They stayed for four years, before moving on to Diss, Norfolk. After many years of active service, Rev. Henry Bennett passed away in September 1948, aged 92.

 

Parents images courtesy of Dr. Jill Barber. Visit our community archive for Primitive Methodism at:  www.myprimitivemethodists.org.uk

 

Image 1907-8 Downing College Association Football 

The obituary in the Downing College magazine, The Griffin (Michaelmas 1916)

Sydney Garner Bennett (Bennett, S. G., Suffolk Regt., Lieut.), killed instantaneously in action by a shell on 21 July 1916 was the only son of the Rev. H. and Mrs. Bennett, of Clacton-on-Sea. The Rev. H. Bennett was stationed at Cambridge for four years as Primitive Methodist minister. Lieut. Bennett was educated at the East Anglian School, Bury St. Edmunds, and the Higher Grade School, Cambridge. Whilst teaching at Springfield School, Ipswich, he gained a scholarship, and passed on to Downing College in 1907, where after a successful career he secured a good position in the teaching profession in Egypt. After war broke out he enlisted in the Suffolks, receiving his commission about 15 months ago [mid 1915]. He had served several months in the trenches. He was good at cricket, and often played for Suffolk, as well as for his college.

“History of the Suffolk Regiment” by Lt Col Murphy has:-
On July 20th the battalion, having assembled and deployed in Pont Street, took part in the renewed attacks of Longueval and Delville Wood. It was still dark when the artillery bombardment lifted and the advance began. The two Suffolk companies in the forward line moved in double lines of platoons with a front of 140 yards each. Much bitter fighting followed. which, though indecisive locally, enabled a footing to be gained in High Wood by a division (33rd) containing another Suffolk battalion, the 4th, and the British line to be linked up thence with Longueval. assalties included officers killed, Capt A.L.Platts; Lt H.N.Kembels; 2nd lt S.Johnson and S.G.Bennet. 5 other officers were missing, later reported killed.

CWGC figures have a total , all ranks, killed as 113, of which 87 have no known grave and are named on the Thiepval memorial.

Diss Express, Friday July28th 1916 page 4 – Courtesy of Culford Schhol http://www.culford.co.uk/:-
“We learn with deep regret that Lieut. Sydney G.Bennett, was killed in action on July 21st (sic). The deceased was the only son of the Rev. H. and Mrs Bennett of Clacton on Sea. The Rev. Bennett was stationed in Diss for some years as Primitive Methodist Minister. Lieut. Bennett was educated at the East Anglian School, Bury St Edmunds and Higher Grade school at Cambridge. Whilst teaching at Springfield School, Ipswich, he gained a scholarship and passed onto Downing College, Cambridge, where, after a successful career he secured a good position in the teaching profession in Egypt. After war was declared he enlisted in the 3rd Suffolks, receiving his commission about 15 months ago. He had served several months in the trenches. He was well known in athletic circles, was good at cricket and often played for Diss, when visiting his parents in the town. He also played football and lawn tennis for local clubs.

Suffolk Regiment, 3rd Battalion.

Suffolk Regiment Battalion movements

SUFFOLK REGIMENT MUSEUM

Friends of The Suffolk Regiment

Posted in First World War, Suffolk Regiment

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