PERCY WILLIAM SCRUTTON

 

Photo courtesy of  Tean.  

   

image from 1917 Chronicle newspaper.

 

Born: 1893, Ipswich.

Died: 28th April 1917; age 23; KiA.

Residence: 6, Calcutta Villas, Croft Street, Ipswich.

 

Rank: Private; Service Number: 24104

Regiment: Suffolk Regiment, 11th Battalion.

 

Medals Awarded: Victory & British War.

 

Grave Reference:

II.G.25.

Brown’s Copse Cemetery,

Roelix,

Pas de Calais,

France.

 

Relatives Notified & Address: Son of Charles & Rose Scrutton.

 

Brother to HENRY CHARLES SCRUTTON.

 

CENSUS

 

1901   2, Little Croft Street, Ipswich.

 

Percy was 7 years old and living with his parents & siblings.

Charles Scrutton, 42, a Papermaking Machinist, born Woodbridge, Suffolk.

Rose Scrutton (nee Garnham), 43, born Bramford, Suffolk.

Rosie May Scrutton, 20, a Printer, born Bramford.

Edith Lily Scrutton, 18, a Bookbinder, born Bramford.

Hilda Daisy Scrutton, 17, a Pupil Teacher, born Bramford.

Henry Charles Scrutton, 14, an Apprentice Engineer’s Fitter, born Bramford.

Eva Alice Scrutton, 12, born Bramford.

Alfred Edward Scrutton, 9, born Ipswich.

Elsie Margery Scrutton, 5, born Ipswich.

Russell Roland Scrutton, 5 months, born Ipswich.

 

1911   6, Calcutta Villas, Croft Street, Ipswich.

 

Percy was 17 years old, an Outfitter’s Apprentice – Tailor’s Outfitters. He was living with his parents & siblings.

Charles, 52, a Carpenter’s Rough – Veterinary Surgeon.

Rose, 53.

Lily, 27, a Bookbinder – Printer & Stationer.

Alfred, 19, a Chartered Accountant’s Clerk – Chartered Accountant.

Elsie, 15.

Russell, 10.

Percy is also remembered on St Mary at Stoke Church Ipswich, War Memorial.

Percy’s sister, Eva served as a nurse during the war. She tragically died in 1920, of Influenza.

Personal effects sent home after his death.

 

Suffolk Regiment, 11th Battalion:

The Battle of Arleux.

The 11th Battalion of the Suffolk Regiment as part of the 101st Brigade, formed an attack of Roeux chemical works of the Northern edge of the town, just south of the railway line. At 4:27 on the 28th of April 1917 the attack by the 11th began, troops pushed forward but came under heavy machinegun fire which drove the men back. A small group pushed on into the quarry on the eastern edge of the chemical works, being unsupported. At night fall they returned with 3 prisoners. The opening barrage had failed to destroy the machinegun posts and the enemy trenches, casing the attack to fail. The emery counter attacked from Roeux. taking Mount Pleasant wood, being part of the Ceylon trench at 9:45 a.m. The Battalion took over 300 casualties. The same fait was to happen to the 7th Battalion of the Suffolk regiment taking 190 casualties. 13 Ipswich men were killed on this day.

 

Suffolk Regiment Battalion movements

Friends of The Suffolk Regiment

Posted in First World War, Suffolk Regiment

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