CHARLES PRYKE BULTITUDE

Served as COOK.

 

Born: 1877, Ipswich.

Died: 21st February 1921; age: 56.

 

Rank: Lance Corporal; Service Number: P/16612.

Regiment: Military Police Corps, Military Foot Police.

 

Grave Reference:

H.26.3.

Ipswich Old Cemetery,

Ipswich.

 

Brother to FREDERICK WILLIAM PRYKE BULTITUDE.

 

CENSUS

 

1881   9, Frost’s Court, Ipswich.

 

Charles was 4 years old and living with his parents & brother. The family surname was Cook.

Charles Bultitude Cook, 25, a Shoemaker, born Norwich, Norfolk.

Sarah Ann Cook (nee Pryke), 24, born Stowmarket, Suffolk.

Frederick William Pryke Cook, 2, born Ipswich.

 

1891   10, Gipping Street, Ipswich.

 

Charles was 14. He was living with his parents & brother. The family surname was Cook.

Charles, 34, a Shoe Riveter.

Sarah, 34, a Tailoress.

Frederick, 13.

 

1911   5, West Gate Court, Black Horse Lane, Ipswich.

 

Charles was 34 years old, a Stone Breaker – Ipswich Corporation. He was recorded as married – but his wife had deserted him.

Mary Anna Sadd, 24, Ipswich.

 

Charles’s father, Charles Bultitude Cook, died 1893, Ipswich. His mother Sarah Ann Boyer, died 1904, Ipswich.

 

In 1902, Ipswich, Charles married Annie Rosina Crump, born 1884, Canterbury, Kent – baptised: 10th June 1884, Canterbury.

Whilst still married to Charles, Annie married Sidney Tournay Godfrey, in 1908, Canterbury. She was convicted in Suffolk of Bigamy – 8th November 1913.

 

Charles’s brother Frederick William Pryke Bultitude also died as a result of the First World War, on the 28th September 1919, aged 41. He was a Driver, service number 1421, of the Royal Field Artillery. Frederick was also laid to rest at Ipswich Old Cemetery.

 

Charles & Frederick’s youngest brother, Thomas Henry Bultitude, aged 49, of 1, Mount Pleasant Cottages, Manor Road, Chigwell, Essex, was killed in the Second World War at the ‘Prince of Wales’ Manor Road, Chigwell, Essex. When at 9.45pm a German aircraft dropped a parachute bomb. It was a direct hit on the pub which was reduced to a pile of rubble with 40 plus causalities.

Posted in First World War

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