ARTHUR WALTER NUNN

Photograph courtesy of John Vincent.

 

Born: 6th March 1893, 16, Waterloo Road, Ipswich.

Died: 4th October 1918; age 25; KiA with T.B.D. in North Sea.

Employed: by Mr. Alfred Cooper, of Crown Street, Ipswich – a Corn & Flour Merchant.

Enlisted: 1915.

 

Rank: Stoker 1st Class; Service Number: K/26311

Regiment: Royal Navy, H.M. S/M ‘L10’.

 

arthur-walter-nunn

Memorial Reference:

29.

Chatham Naval Memorial,

Kent.

 

Image from the Suffolk Chronicle And Mercury – 1918

 

Relatives Notified & Address: Husband of Olive Mary Hancock (formerly Nunn), of 411, Nacton Road, Ipswich.

 

CENSUS

 

1901   5, Dyke Street, Ipswich.

 

Arthur was 8 years old and living with his mother & siblings.

Lilly Nunn (nee Gallifant), 26, born Halstead, Essex.

Maud Gallifant, 10, born Ipswich.

James William Nunn, 3, born Ipswich.

Ernest Nunn, 1, born Ipswich.

1 boarder.

 

1911   18, Beck Street, Ipswich.

 

Arthur was 18 years old, a Forage Carter. He was a boarder at the home of 24 year old, Walter Benjamin Burrows, a Forage Carter,.

 

Arthur’s father was Arthur William Nunn, born 1870, in Ipswich. Arthur left his wife and family in 1900.

 

In 1914, Ipswich, Arthur married Olive Mary Welham, born July 1896, Ipswich.

Olive and Arthur had two sons:

Arthur W. Nunn, 1916, Ipswich.

Arthur James Nunn, born January 1919, Ipswich.

 

Arthur is also remembered on the war memorial at St. Mary Le Elm Church, Ipswich.

 

H.M. S/M ‘L10’.

Sunk north of Terschelling by gunfire from German ships


On the morning of 3rd October 1918 HMS L10 was in the vicinity of a German convoy, which had, the previous night, been attacked by British Destroyers. That afternoon a number of German ships were spotted searching the area for survivors and L10 signalled her intention of attacking the German squadron, which consisted of the Destroyers S33 and S34 and two torpedo boats heading from Zeebrugge to Germany.
S34 struck a mine with the result that the other ships were forced to ignore the danger of mines to rescue the sinking destroyer’s crew. L10 moved in and fired a torpedo at S33. S33 was severely damaged but initial thoughts of another mine were dispelled when L10’s conning tower broached the surface. S33 managed to bring her guns to bear and sank the submarine through persistent shelling.

 

 

 

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