Born: 1887, St. Michael’s, Ipswich.

Died: 6th June 1915; Died of Wounds – Gallipoli.

Enlistment Location: Ipswich.


Rank: Sergeant; Service Number: 1558.

Regiment: Royal Army Medical Corps, 88th (1st/1st East Anglian) Field Ambulance.


Medals Awarded: Victory, British War & 1915 Star.


Grave Reference:

Addenda Panel.

Cape Helles Memorial,

Turkey (including Gallipoli).




1891   12, Permit Office Street, Ipswich.


Walter was 3 years old and living with his parents & sisters. They were living with his widowed, maternal grandmother, aunt & uncle.

Lydia Sugars (nee Hearn), 49, born Framsden, Suffolk.

Laura Sugars, 21, a Stay Binder, born Ipswich.

Herbert Robert Sugars, 19, a General Labourer, born Ipswich.

Walter Gosling, 28, a Baker, born Ipswich.

Lucy Gosling (nee Sugars), 23, a Stay Binder, born Ipswich.

Lucy Caroline Gosling, 8, born Ipswich.

Laura Lydia Gosling, 1, born Ipswich.


1901   53, Cox Lane, Ipswich.


Walter was 13 years old, an Errand Boy. he was living with his parents, sisters & grandmother.

Walter, 39, a General Labourer.

Lucy, 36, a Stay Binder.

Lucy, 15, a Machinist.

Laura, 11.

Lilian Ellen Gosling, 7, born Ipswich.

Lydia Sugars, 60.


1911   17, James Street, Ipswich.


Walter was 23 years old, a Packer – Printing & Stationery. He was staying with his sister, brother-in-law & niece.

James Benjamin Talbot, 26, an Assistant Jam Boiler – Jam Factory, born Ipswich.

Lucy Talbot (nee Gosling), 25.

Lucy Alice S. Talbot, 11 months, born Ipswich.


Walter’s maternal grandmother, Lydia Sugars died 1905, Ipswich.

In 1911, Ipswich Walter married Lydia Ellen Norton, born 1888, Ipswich.


Probate to Lydia Ellen Gosling – widow.


The Royal Army Medical Corps (RAMC) is part of the British Army providing medical services to all British Army personnel and their families in war and in peace. Together with the Royal Army Veterinary Corps, the Royal Army Dental Corps and Queen Alexandra’s Royal Army Nursing Corps, the RAMC forms the British Army’s essential Army Medical Services. In combat the men followed the troops over the top into no man’s land suffering losses of 743 officers and 6130 soldiers killed, while delivering medical care to wounded exposed to enemy fire.



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