JOSEPH HENRY GILSON

 

 

Born: 1890, Ipswich.

Died: 22nd September 1917; age 27; Died of Wounds – Shell Wound – Abdomen.

Residence: 30, Darnley Road, Grays, Essex.

 

Enlistment Details: Location: Grove Park; Date: 17th November 1915; Age: 25 years & 4 months; Occupation: Ford Motor Driver; Next of Kin – father – George Alexander Gilson, of 10, Trovells Road, Ipswich. Signed up for the duration of the war. Height: 5ft 9ins.

 

Mobilised – 22nd January 1917 – Posted – 23rd January 1917 – Joined – 25th January 1917 – Embarked on board S.S. ‘Hunsgrove’ Portsmouth – 13th March 1917 disembarked – Rouen – 18th March 1917. Posted to 1st Base – Mechanical Transport – 10th April 1917.

 

Rank: Private; Service Number: M/285223; Regiment: Army Service Corps, Mechanical Transport attached 138th Field Ambulance, Royal Army Medical Corps.

Medals Awarded: Victory & British War.

 

Grave Reference:

II.A.2.

Westouter Churchyard & Extension.

West-Vlaanderen,

Belgium.

 

Cousin to JAMES FREDERICK GILSON

 

CENSUS

 

1891   5, Tovells Road, Ipswich.

 

Joseph was 9 months old and living with his parents & siblings.

George Gilson, 33, an Iron Moulder, born Ipswich.

Mary Ann Gilson (nee Halliday), 32, a Laundress, born Ipswich.

Blanche Alexandra Gilson, 11, born Ipswich.

Violet Margaret E. Gilson, 9, born Ipswich.

George Alexander Gilson, 6, born Ipswich.

William James Gilson, 3, born Ipswich.

 

1901   10, Tovells Road, Ipswich.

 

Joseph was 10 years old and living with his parents & siblings.

George, 43, an Iron Moulder – Plough Share Factory.

Mary Ann, 42.

Violet, 19, an Upholstress.

George, 16, a Picture Frame Maker.

William, 13.

James Albert Gilson, 7, born Ipswich.

 

1911   22, Belle Vue Road, Colchester, Essex.

 

Joseph was 20 years old, a House Painter. He was living with his sister and her husband of 2 years.

John Lockley, 28, a Rose Growers Clerk.

Violet, 29.

Army Service Corps:

http://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/regiments-and-corps/the-army-service-corps-in-the-first-world-war/

 

Posted in First World War

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