HARRY GEORGE JOWERS

image from 1916 Suffolk Chronicle and Mercury newspaper.

Born: 18th October 1895, Ipswich.

Died: 29th July 1916; age 20; KiA.

Place of Association: Nagambie, Australia. He was employed by Mr Balazey, Butcher at Nagambie. He was also well known by Mr Robertson, Orange Grove, Shepperton.

Enlistment Details: Date: 27th April 1915; Occupation: Butcher; Religion: CofE; Next of Kin: Father – Henry James Jowers, 11, Lister Road, Ipswich.

Embarked – Brisbane – 29th June 1915; on board Ship HMAT ‘Aereas’ A60.

 

Rank: Private; Service Number: 1526;

Regiment: Australian Imperial Force, Australian Infantry, 26th Battalion.

 

Grave Reference:

Plot VII. Row C. Grave No. 22.

Courcelette British Cemetery,

Somme,

France.

Relatives Notified & Address: Son of Henry James & Annie Alice Jowers, of 11, Lister Road, Ipswich.

 

Nephew to JOHN OSMAN PASHA JOWERS.

JOHN OSMAN PASHA JOWERS PASHA

 

CENSUS

 

1901   58, Surbiton Road, Ipswich.

 

Harry was 5 years old and living with his parents & siblings.

Henry James Jowers, 32, a Gardener – Domestic – own account, born Ipswich.

Annie A. Jowers (nee Smith), 25, born Upton, Norfolk.

Jack Herbert V. Jowers, 4, born Ipswich.

Dorothy Jean Jowers, 2, born Ipswich.

Hilda Rachel Jowers, 2 months, born Ipswich.

 

1911   11, Lister Road, Ipswich.

 

Harry was 15, a Butchers Assistant. He was living with his parents & siblings.

Henry, 42, a Laundryman – own account.

Annie, 35.

Jack, 14, a Milk Boy.

Dorothy, 12.

Hilda, 10.

Edward Leslie Jowers, 8, born Ipswich.

Jessie Agnes Jowers, 6, born Ipswich.

 

On the 25th September 1913, Harry travelled on the ‘Irishman’ of the White Star Line, from the port of Liverpool bound for Australia. He was to be a Farm Hand. harry arrives at the port of Sydney, Australia on the 11th November 1913.

 

The Australian Red Cross Society – Wounded & Missing Bureau, began an enquiry for Harry who had been reported as missing since the 29th July 1916. His father Henry wrote to the War Office for more information on his son.

It was first believed that Harry was a Prisoner of War – Westphalia, Germany, but no trace was found. The Australian Red Cross then received a report which confirmed that Harry had been KiA. A letter to confirm this information was then sent to the family.

 

Australian Imperial Force, Australian Infantry, 26th Battalion:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/26th_Battalion_(Australia)

Posted in First World War

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