HARRY EDWARD DEAN

Laid to rest at the Field of Honour.

Image from 1918 Chronicle newspaper.

 

Born: 1898, Jarrow-on-Tyne, Durham.

Died: 20th February 1918; age: 19; at Ipswich Isolation Hospital.

Enlistment Location: Jarrow, Durham.

Rank: Private; Service Number: 48382.

Regiment: North Staffordshire (Prince of Wales’s) Regiment, 4th Battalion.

 

Medals Awarded: Victory & British War.

 

Grave Reference:

BA.IA.14.

Ipswich Old Cemetery,

Ipswich.

 

Relatives Notified & Address: Son of Henry Edward J. Dean and the late Janet Dean (nee McGivin) of 79, Tyne Street, Jarrow.

 

CENSUS

 

1901   30, Catherine Street, Jarrow, Durham.

 

Harry was 2 years old and living with his parents & brother.

Henry Edward J. Dean, 30, a General Labourer, born Jarrow.

Janet Dean (nee McGivin), 27, born Jarrow.

John McGibbon Dean, 8 months, born Jarrow – died 1901, Jarrow.

 

1911   23, Grace Street, South Shields.

 

Harry was 12 years old and living with his widowed father & brother.

Harry, 40, a Metal Works – Labourer.

James Alexander Dean, 9, born Jarrow.

 

Harry’s mother Janet Dean, died 1908, Jarrow.

 

Soldiers’ Effects to Margaret Sprout – aunt.

 

SOLDIER’S FUNERAL AT IPSWICH CEMETERY.

The funeral took place on Saturday morning, in the Field of Honour at the Ipswich Cemetery, of Pte. Harry Edward Dean, Machine-gun Corps, who died in Ipswich Isolation Hospital on Wednesday last. The deceased, who had seen services in France, was the eldest son of Mr. H.E.J. Dean, of 79, Tyne Street, Jarrow-on-Tyne, and had been in the Army some 18 months of Cambria, where he sustained shell-shock; and it was whilst he was convalescing that he contracted the illness to which he succumbed. The remains were accorded full military honours, the coffin, covered with the national colours, being borne to the Cemetery on a gun-carriage drawn by six horses, these being furnished by the Royal Field Artillery, by permission of Colonel Barnes, whilst a firing party, six bearers, and buglers were sent by the Hampshire Regiment, under 2nd Lieut. A. Bennett. The officiating clergyman was the Rev. Isaac Morris, curate of St. Mary Stoke. Owing to the deceased’s home being so far away the only family mourner  present was the father. Laid on the coffin was a laurel display from the Women’s Guild, the coffin was of polished elm, with brass fittings, the inscription reading:- “Pte. Harry E. Dean, Machine-gun Corps; died February 20th 1918; aged 19.” At the conclusion of the committal service three volleys were fired over the grave, the buglers sounding the “Last Post” The funeral arrangements were carried out by Hastings and Son, under the supervision of Mr. P. Hastings.

Posted in First World War

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