CHARLES SAMUEL COTTON

image from 1916 Suffolk Chronicle and Mercury newspaper.

 

Born: 10th November 1884, Ipswich.

Died: 24th April 1916; age 31; died at sea.

Residence: 61, Cavendish Street, Ipswich.

 

Rank: Leading Deck Hand; Service Number: 9/SD

Regiment: Royal Naval Reserve, H.M.Trawler ‘Lena Melling’.

 

Grave Reference:

BA.I.24.

Old Ipswich Cemetery,

Ipswich,

Suffolk.

 

Relatives Notified & Address: Son of George & Lydia Cotton, of 120, Cavendish Street, Ipswich; husband of Adelaide Cotton, of 61, Cavendish Street, Ipswich.

 

CENSUS

 

1891   2, Burton’s Yard, College Street, Ipswich.

 

Charles was 7 years old and living with his parents & siblings.

George Cotton, 32, a Grocer’s Carter, born Aldeburgh, Suffolk.

Lydia Cotton (nee Crane), 29, born Ipswich.

William George Cotton, 10, born Ipswich.

Gertrude Sarah Cotton, 2, born Ipswich.

 

1901   50, Wykes Bishop Street, Ipswich.

 

Charles was 17 years old, a Seaman. He was living with his parents & siblings.

George, 43, a Waterman – Rivers – Barge.

Lydia, 41.

William, 19, a Seaman.

Gertrude, 12.

Ellen Beatrice Cotton, 9 born Ipswich.

Ernest Cotton, 8, born Ipswich.

Leslie Cotton, 3, born Ipswich.

 

1911   61, Cavendish Street, Ipswich.

 

Charles was 27 years old, a Dock Labourer. He was married and Head of the Household.

Adelaide, 26.

Wilfred, 4.

Leonard, 1.

 

In 1905, Ipswich, Charles married, Adelaide Vincent, born 1885, Ipswich. They had 2 children:

Wilfred Charles W. Cotton, born September 1906, Ipswich.

Leonard Percy Cotton, April 1909, Ipswich.

IPSWICH MAN KILLED AT SEA.

The funeral took place at the Ipswich Cemetery on Friday last of Charles Samuel Cotton, late of 61, Cavendish Street, Ipswich, who, whilst pursuing his duty as a minesweeper, met his death at sea on April 24th last. The remains were buried with full military honours, the coffin being borne to the grave on a gun-carriage, with firing party and buglers in attendance. The picture shows the coffin on the gun-carriage at the Cemetery, and inset a portrait of the deceased.

The minesweeper H.M. Trawler was sunk by a mine near the ‘Elbow’ Light Buoy, near Broadstairs, Kent. The mine was laid by UC-7, (Georg Haag). 11 persons were lost, 3 survivors.

 

 

Posted in First World War

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*