CHARLES EDWARD BURSTALL

 

 

Born: 1877, Tattingstone, Suffolk.

Died: 15th May 1918; age 41; Died of Wounds – No.16 General Hospital.

Enlistment Location: Ipswich.

Rank: Private; Service Number: 476350

Regiment: Suffolk Regiment, 101st Company. Labour Corps.

Formerly 9224, Suffolk Regiment.

Medals Awarded: Victory, British War & 1914 Star.

 

Grave Reference:

  1. H. 4A,

Mont Huon Military Cemetery,

Le Treport,

Seine-Maritime,

France.

 

CENSUS

 

1881   Grundisburgh, Suffolk.

 

Charles was 3 years old and living with his parents & brother.

William Burstall, 40, a Gardener, born Holbrook, Suffolk.

Charlotte Hannah Burstall (nee Kirby), 35; born Ipswich.

John William Burstall, 11, born Holbrook.

 

1891   23, Parliament Road, Ipswich.

 

Charles was 13 years old and living with his parents & brothers.

William, 55, a Gardener.

Charlotte, 42.

Arthur James Burstall, 10, born Grundisburgh, Suffolk.

Henry George Burstall, 6, born Ipswich.

Albert Robert Burstall, 4, born Ipswich.

 

1901   49, Samuel Road, Ipswich.

 

Charles was 23 years old, a Railway Telegraph Labourer. He was living with his parents & brothers.

William, 65, a Gardener (not domestic)

Charlotte, 50.

John, 31, a Railway Telegraph Labourer.

Henry, 16, a Blacksmith’s Striker at Foundry.

Albert, 14.

 

1911   18, Suffolk Road, Ipswich.

 

Charles was 33 years old, a Net Maker to a manufacture. He was married & Head of the Household.

Elizabeth, 32.

Ivy, 3.

Ellen, 4.

Percy, 2.

Lucy, under 3 months.

aunt – Mary Self, 60, a Widow.

brother – Arthur Burstall, 27, a Maltsters Labourer.

 

On Christmas Day, 1903, Ipswich, Charles married Elizabeth Bugg, 1878, Ipswich. They had five children all born in Ipswich:

Ivy May Burstall, 1904.

Ellen Elizabeth Burstall, 1906.

Percy Charles Edward Burstall, 1908.

Lucy Charlotte Burstall, 1911.

Hilda Florence Burstall, 1913.

 

Charles is also remembered on the war memorial at St. Margaret’s Church, Ipswich.

LABOUR CORPS.

Formed in January 1917, 389,900 men 10% of the total size of the British Army. Many of the men had already served in other units and were taken on following being wounded then being made fit for duty “A1” condition. The companies were employed in general labouring, fetching and carrying in work within range of the enemy guns. Sometimes used as emergency infantry during major offensives by the enemy.

Labour Corps units were sometimes classed as second class soldiers but were an important part of the British army.

 

Suffolk Regiment

Suffolk Regiment Battalion movements

Suffolk Regiment website

Friends of The Suffolk Regiment

 

 

Posted in First World War, Suffolk Regiment

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