BARRY JOHN JENNINGS

 

 

Born: 1897, St. Clement’s, Ipswich.

Died: 3rd December 1917; age 20; Died of Wounds – 5th Casualty Clearing Station.

Residence: 112, Camden Road, Ipswich.

Enlistment Details: Location: Ipswich; Date: 18th May 1914; age: 17 years; Occupation: Warehouseman – W.S. Connell, Buttermarket, Ipswich. Height: 5ft 2 1/2ins.

Rank: Private; Service Number: 473108; Regiment: Royal Army Medical Corps, 88th Field Ambulance.

Medals Awarded: Victory & British War.

 

Grave Reference:

III.F.21.

Tincourt New British Cemetery,

Somme,

France.

 

Brother to CHARLES BENJAMIN JENNINGS.

 

CENSUS

 

1901   387, Spring Road, Ipswich.

 

Barry was 4 years old and living with his parents & siblings.

Benjamin Jennings, 31, a Plasterer Labourer, born Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk.

Laura Jennings (nee Granger), 31, born Earl Stonham, Suffolk.

Maud Jennings, 15, a Day Girl – Domestic, born Coddenham, Suffolk.

Horace Jennings, 11, born Crowfield, Suffolk.

Charles Benjamin Jennings, 9, born Ipswich.

Mabel Victoria Jennings, 1, born Ipswich.

 

1911   22, Cowper Street, Ipswich.

 

Barry was 14 years old and living with his widowed mother & sisters.

Laura, 40, a Needlewoman.

Ruby Jennings, 5, born Ipswich.

Hilda May Jennings, 3, born Ipswich.

 

Barry’s father, Benjamin Jennings, died in 1909, Ipswich.

 

The Royal Army Medical Corps (RAMC) is part of the British Army providing medical services to all British Army personnel and their families in war and in peace. Together with the Royal Army Veterinary Corps, the Royal Army Dental Corps and Queen Alexandra’s Royal Army Nursing Corps, the RAMC forms the British Army’s essential Army Medical Services. In combat the men followed the troops over the top into no man’s land suffering losses of 743 officers and 6130 soldiers killed, while delivering medical care to wounded exposed to enemy fire.

 

Royal Army Medical Corps, 88th Field Ambulance:

http://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/regiments-and-corps/royal-army-medical-corps-in-the-first-world-war/

 

Posted in First World War

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