ARTHUR HENRY MINTER*

Photograph courtesy of Susan Claydon

 

Born: 9th May 1892, Trimley St. Martin, Suffolk.

Died: 1st March 1916; age 24; KiA with submarine in the Mediterranean. Served 9 years.

Rank: Leading Seaman; Service Number: J/905 (Ch)

Regiment: Royal Navy, H.M.S. ‘Primula’

 

Memorial Reference:

Chatham Naval Memorial,

Chatham,

Kent.

 

Relatives Notified & Address: Son of Mr & Mrs Minter, of 82, Schreiber Road, Ipswich; husband of Florence Annie Minter, of 28, Cavendish Street, Ipswich.

 

Brother to GEORGE FREDERICK MINTER

 

CENSUS

 

1901   21, Parliament Road, Ipswich.

 

Arthur was 8 years old and living with his parents & siblings.

Frederick Minter, 32, a Bricklayer’s Labourer, born Stadbroke, Suffolk.

Ellen Minter (nee Jennings), 31, born Nacton, Suffolk.

Ellen Sarah Minter, 7, born Trimley St. Martin, Suffolk.

George Frederick Minter, 5, born Trimley St. Martin.

William Thomas Minter, 4, born Ipswich.

 

1911   Kingston Harbour, Jamaica, West Indies.

Arther Henry Minter

 

Arthur was 18 years old, an Able Seaman, on board H.M.S. ‘Scylla’ a 2nd Class Protected Cruiser – Commander Bertram Sackville Thesinger.

 

In 1915, Ipswich, Arthur married Florence Annie Crane, born 1894, Ipswich.

 

 

AN IPSWICH WARRIOR FAMILY

The Minter family whose home is at 82, Schreiber Road Ipswich, is a burly, fighting family. The father, F. Minter, who is 42 years of age, is serving in France with the Royal Engineers. The names of the sons are:- 1. Arthur Henry Minter, leading seaman, lost on active service in the Mediterranean on March 1st last. Had seen nine years’ service. 2. Prvt. George Frederick Minter, 1st Norfolk Regiment, now in France. 3. William Thomas Minter, 3rd E.A. Howitzer Brigade, R.F.A. (T.T. 4. Walter Frederick Minter, aged 14 in the Scouts.

H.M.S. ‘Primula’

H.M.S. ‘Primula’ was an Arabis (Flower) class sloop/minesweeper. Whilst on patrol in the Mediterranean she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-35(Lothar van Arnauld de la Periere) near Cerigo Island. 4 persons were lost.

Posted in First World War

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